Skip to main content

About your Search

20131101
20131130
SHOW
News 83
Stossel 13
Journal 12
RT News 10
( more )
STATION
ALJAZAM 96
KCSM (PBS) 62
CNBC 31
CSPAN 24
CNNW 23
CSPAN2 23
KQED (PBS) 20
FBC 18
LINKTV 17
MSNBCW 16
MSNBC 11
KGO (ABC) 9
WHUT (Howard University Television) 8
COM 6
CSPAN3 6
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 384
French 18
Korean 2
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 417 (some duplicates have been removed)
, and greece and italy. when it comes time to vote, they will realize, don't ruin a good thing. neil: you would think. a lot of liberal are not great at math, realizing the big return you get from having a competitive economy, a lot of u.s. firms have congregated there and started opening up shop in switzerland, they don't want to chase that away. but some social democrats in switzerland say it is not worth. surely the swiss population must see that is screwy. >> this is why i predict this will be defeated. switzerland is the fourth freest economy in the world, they attract a lot of investment not just banks major multinationals like nestles and schindler, they use switzerland as their location for european manufacturing, and involvement. whether they are u.s. firms or local swiss firms, the swiss people are not going to wreck that, i would hope they shouldn't, you could go back 6 years in the past -- 60 years in the past, and new york was our richest most prosperous state, and yet they have high taxes, they are losing jobs to other states. neil: you would look at france, and some other country
't afford the bronze plan, people who don't qualify for medicaid because they make a little too much. at the same time there are poor people and they may not qualify for the pronz plan. what i'm hearing two-thirds of the people who get these cancellation notices they will actually be offered plans that are better and going to get subsidies from the government. another third will have to pay more, younger, healthier people. then that smaller group that has people who are poor but not poor enough to qualify for medicare is the one that really concerns them. >> juan, this is bob. by the way, the aei is a right-wing think tank, about the last place i would go for any definitive numbers. leaving that aside, did they say anything about the legislation that the republicans passed in the house? >> no. i mean, look, this is very interesting, bob. basically the attitude was look the republicans don't want to work with us. they are totally opposed to anything. and they are delighting in our trouble. but the fact is they think once the market gets stabilized, once everything is in place, once th
involved. that's where we're at right now with the obama care. i'm not a health care expert but you don't have to be to see what's going wrong. this plan is not workable. why does he not realize that? why are we worried about poll numbers? this is not working. it's a disaster. why does he not acknowledge it? why are liberals marching into the white house to get a message down? why are we having nuclear talks on thursday about 51 votes? this is an emergency. he would defuse a lot of resistance if he would admit this is the point we're at right now. >> yes, bob, answer all that -- >> first of all, for -- let me make a point he ought to go back. there are two presidents who had lower ratings and came way back up. so that's the answer to your -- your point. in this case, you don't believe it works. eric, nobody around this table with the exception of me thinks there's probably some hope for it. obama believes it works. he thinks there's a way. now, you can argue the policy. and if it is impossible, obama's presidency is pretty much over. >> i don't think he really believed it's going to wor
, maybe if you shouted "i love you steven." (audience complies. ) i don't know. (laughter) maybe if you whispered it. (audience complies) (laughter) folks, but no, no, i'm just -- i'm just too mad about obamacare, folks. (laughter) you see, the rollout has been one disaster after the next. actually, you can't even get to the next disaster, you get an error page that says 404: disaster not found. (laughter) well, folks, today the healthcare.gov web site has sunk to new dot-lows. jim? >> we've all become familiar with this smiling woman who has graced the front of the health care web site since its launch. well, check this out, she's gone. >> she's now been replaced screen right with some handy icons showing you the different ways you can sign up. no word on why the change. >> stephen: i'll tell you why the change-- death panels got her. (laughter) prove me wrong, obama! folks, this affects me very deeply. over the past month, obamacare lady and i grew very close. (laughter) i mean, we had an instant connection until it disconnected me. (laughter) still, we spent a lot of time together lo
of the region and said the zionist regime is doomed to destruction. we don't have full access and inspection of every site. only the ones they designated that it's okay. why would america take the deal and open up billions. they now have time and money to ease pressure and continue their program. >> exactly, sean. this is terrible. i think most americans will be opposed to it. not just republicans in congress but democratic members as well. chuck schumer in new york. >> bob menendez in new jersey. >> senator menendez chairs the foreign relations committee. it's terrible and i think there will be a reaction in congress against it. >> john bolton has a point though. this was about stopping israel from defending itself. if you go back to february of 2012, leon panetta told the washington post they would attack april, may or june. you don't betray a friend like that. at the end of march when they were afraid they were going to attack they released that they would use azerbajan. then they wouldn't allow it. >> israel is alone. >> they are negotiating with france, saudi arabia. >> the saudis were
states and around the world. but it's a matter of our clients are a little bit more cautious. but i don't know that this quarter or next quarter that you'll see any effect on our business materially. >> and stores products retailer container store, they raised $225 million. the ipo was priced at $18 a share, the top end of its increased price range. stairs are set to start trading on the new york stock exchange today under the symbol tcs. >>> microsoft co-founder paul allen's fund is suggesting microsoft spin off its consumer business. this is big news. the man who manages allen's fortune is now suggesting that microsoft search and xbox business res deextracting from the software business which drives earnings. so i mean, paul allen and bill gates, i don't think they're -- they've been spending@of time together these days, anyway, joe. >> no. and the roys. these guys found or fund companies, whatever it is, they don't -- i don't know, over the years, things happen. i think we'll always be together. >> we'll always be together. >> i saw a picture of gates on the ft today. interesting. wh
a. >> imagine >> fighting fires we don't do on our own. image if everyone had their own fire service. >> image then. >> private fire companies work all over america and do a better job. >> it comes with being efficient at what you do and how you spend your money. >> traffic lights are synchronized so there aren't traffic jams. >> there's your lap dop top. >> libraries are better run, too. they are mouch more computerize. they have clean water for less because the workers now work. >> were you goofing off before sitting around drinking coffee? >> occasionally. >> but the left hate privatization. >> they don't want to pay for the things the roads, the dams and the rivers. >> yes, we do. we just want the money spent well. >> privatize the police department, privatize everything. >> privatize everything. that is our show tonight. >> oo now john stossel. >> privatize erg. may -- everything. maybe i got carried away. there are some things government. ought to do. most are listed in the year of the constitution. this is the spin. this makes it clear there's not much the government s
novels, they can really bureau into a series and they don't have to wait for commercial break. you know, .. they don't have to be at their couch thursday at eight. >> rose: they can be there saturday morning and watch three hours in a row. >> exactly, they can binge and the quality of the material, it keeps escalating, and it is really very thrilling. >> rose: homeland, obviously is a great success because of good writing, good acting, and a very interesting narrative. but more than that, what is it you think makes homeland such an obsession for so many americans? >> well -- >> rose: they don't like it. they get a little bit angry. >> yeah, well, i mean, it is a sign that they care. >> rose: exactly right. no, it is. we will talk about that. >> yeah. i mean, when i read the pilot, you know, the ending was just so -- it was so, so well constructed and i was, you know, greedy for next one, and i got the sense that would be the case with every episode, and, you know, it is really provocative subject matter and, you know, it is incredibly relevant to what is happening right now and that mad
when he said here's what i really meant and went on blah, blah, blah. i don't see that the president gets how important politically that was. >> we may have different definitions of apologies. maybe it's a partisan thing. i don't know. i thought an apology is when you say i'm sorry. i watch that had clip and i thought i heard him say i'm sorry. >> i thought he said he was sorry that people didn't understand what he was saying. and sorry that he may not have explained it right. i didn't hear him really say i'm sorry that i said i'd let you keep your insurance and your doctor and we went back on our word. i didn't hear that. i did hear the word sorry, i'll grant you that, but i thought it was a rather sorry performance. >> i think they might feel sorry coming next year because the beggar problems are yet to come. the small group plans got an extension because they renewed off cycle. so they won't start getting dropped until closer to the end of 2014. but i think the biggest problem is people will enroll and try to use the coverage and nip who was previously insured and now on an obama
spinet they don't want to payor the roads or the diems. yes we do. we just want the money spent wall. >> privatize the police department, the fire department, everything. >> privatize everything. that is our show. tonight. john: privatize everything. maybe i did not mean that. i got caied away. there are something this government ought to do. most are listed in the constituon. but this is thin and it makes it very car there isn't much step bounders thought the government should dubos lee what the feral government should not do and they were right because most things work better if the central planners but out of leaving more freedom of choice. how much can reprivatize what shoulwe privatize? leonard gilroy studies that for the reason foundation. >> changing the oil in vehicles, a sweeping streets orrimming trees were many cities pay public employees lavish salaries and benefits to perform functions you could give to the private sector. john: why do you get better bids? why couldn't the government employees dot cheaper or better? >> youave a monopoly and by definition you don't have c
? we don't have full access and inspection of every site. only the ones that they designade designate it's okay. so why would america take that deal and open up billions? they now have time and money to ease the pressure and continue their program. >> exactly, sean. this is terrible. i think that most americans will be opposed to it. and not only those who serve you should the republican side in congress, but democratic members as well. for exampling chuck schumer here in new york. >> bob mendez in new jersey. >> i think it's terrible. and i think there will be a reaction in congress against it. >> i think john bolton has a point, though. this was about stopping israel from defending itself. if you go back to february of 2012, this administration, leon panetta told "the washington post" they're going to attack april, may or june, you don't do that to your friends, you don't betray a friend like that. at the end of march, when they were afraid they were going to attack anyway, we have stabbed them in the back repeatedly this fall. >> so israel is alone? >> well, they're negotiating wit
, they are home. they are talking to people who, many of whom have been damaged by sequestration. we don't fwakt a lot and it's hard to visualize on tv that relies on pictures but badly damaged a lot of people. what are the prospects for this kicking in and even cutting further and more deeply into people's lives? >> problems aspects are pretty strong. i talked to a medical researcher about this for one of my pieces and he called sequestration a cancerous tumor. it gets worse over time. a lot of agencies just basically pushed all the administrative cuts as far back as they could during the first year. they used emergency funds to prolong the pain. if this thing doesn't get reversed by early january the cuts get exceptionally worse. agencies have to start laying people off. they will have to do more furloughs. cutback on a lot of problems. the pain that's being felt is going to get worse. good news for people worried about this each party recognizes the problem. each party wants to do something about it. they don't like the cuts to nih, they don't like cuts to research or head start. how do you p
's be honest. we eavesdrop, too. everyone is listening to everyone else. he went on to add, "we don't have the same means as the united states which makes us jealous." america spends tens of billions of dollars on intelligence collection. it's hard to get data to make good comparisons but it is safe to assume that washington's intelligence budget dwarfs that of other countries just as it does with defense spending. it is particularly strange that this rift should develop between the united states and its closest allies in europe. it was predictable and in fact in a sense predicted. in 2002, the british diplomat robert cooper wrote an essay in which he argued that europe was a post-modern international system in which force was no longer a serious option. instead, economic interdependence and cooperation were the governing ideas of state craft. and certainly when one looks at the european union, it does describe its reality. the prospect of war between france and germany which had gone to war three times between 1870 and 1950 seems utterly impossible. but outside of europe, the world is not
to. >> and good news is bad news about that. exactl >> for fighting fires we don't do on our own. imagine if everybody had their own fire service. imagine that the truth is private fire companies were all over america and do a better job. >> you watch liu spend your moy. >> r traffic lights are synchronized so there are no traffic jams. >> private parks are cleaner and safer. libraries our better run. mu more computerized. a private water system the government could not do to bring clean water for less because the workers work. >> were you goofing off before? >> occasionally. but the left hates privatization. >> that no one to pay for them. >> yes but we just want it spent well. >> privatize the police department and the fire department everything. >> yes. privize everything. that is our show. tonight. john: privatize evything. maybe i did not mean that i got carriedway but there are some things government ought to do. most are listed in the constitution. but this is thiand it makes it very clear there is not much the founders thought what they should do it is mostly what the gov
analysis and extra and don't forget instagram and if you missed any part of today's show, sear go to itunes and search state of the union. >> this is "gps." welcome to all of you in the united states and around the world. we have great show for you today. we'll start with nsa spying and uproar it caused in europe especially. germany's former defense minister will explain what is going on there. and then the former nsa director will help us understand what america's spies are really doing around the world and michael bloomberg called the mayor of the world. with the election of his successor on hand, what lessons does bloomberg have to share with us? one of them, cities need rich people. he'll explain. and the latest weapon against bad guys. it's not a new fangled drone or bunker buster bomb. it's simply brittany. i'll explain. revelations about the national security agency and spying on foreign allied leaders has been embarrassing for the obama administration at a time when it hardly needs more bad news. is it more than an embarrassment? should it raise alarms abroad and at home?
lee. see you tomorrow at 5:00. don't go go anywhere. "mad money" with jim cramer starts right now. >>> my mission is simple. to make you money. i'm here to level the playing field for all investors. there's always a bull market somewhere and i promise to help you find it. "mad money" starts now. hey, i'm cramer. welcome to "mad money." welcome to cramerica. other people want to make friends, i'm trying to save you a little money. my job is not just to entertain but to educate and teach you. so call me 1-800-743-cnbc. where can we find the best growth right here right now? isn't that the be all and end all behind so much of we're looking for in the stock market? including today when the dow sank 21 points. nasdaq advancedn .08%. it doesn't matter where we find growth. we always love it when we see it. tonight we hear from regeneron, not only has drugs that are making fortunes for shareholders right now, it also has drugs in the pipeline that could keep that growth going for many years to come. game changing medicines that are disrupting the market and crushing the competition. incl
based on insider insights that the rest of us don't have will be giving their final order indications tonight to their brokers for how much stock they like. i can tell you from people i talked to that many large institutions are simply saying to goldman sachs, the keeper of the books for the deal. look, i do a lot of commission business and i'll take every share i can get. i want 10% of the deal. i want to circle 10% of the deal. that level of demand for a stock is pretty unprecedented, again with the exception of facebook. the reasoning is twofold. first is a good one. these institutional investors are very jazzed, they're excited about the possibility of owning shares in a company that's generated $620 million in revenue and super jazzed about the possibility of revenues increasing to about $1 billion the year after with double the profits. second, though, and this is what worries me about you. the big boys are betting that other less informed investors, people who use twitter and love it like me @jimcramer, people who don't know how to value the stock but just figure how can you go
looking at in the a perfunctory way. you don't see it the way that you do if you focus on it intently. so the photo wes take try to show you a view you haven't seen before. so we have things like the cover photo of a tomato that focuses on the thome know a way that's quite different. >> rose: there you go. what are we going to do about microsoft? >> i worked at microsoft for 14 years. >> rose: you sold them your company and went to work for them. >> yup. i was chief technology officer there. i worked very closely with bill and steve and others. and it will always have a part of my heart. and it's still an incredibly strong, strong company. it was some great internal values. but i think it's lost its way in a few dimensions. >> rose: well, you should know why. >> it's hard to know why. i think it's a better try say how. one is there's so many different agendas it's working on. >> rose: nathan myhrvold for the hour. next. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: nathan myhrvold is here. he is the c.e.o. and co-founder of i
is an icon already. >> is that what the word is derived from. >> i don't know. >> spelled differently. >> not the word icon. i wonder his name. not either. >>> in other corporate news, the government wants bank of america to pay nearly $864 million in damages after a federal jury found it liable for fraud over defective mortgages that were sold in this case by its countrywide unit. government's also asking for penalties against a former mid level executive at countrywide. the jury found her liable as well. and vc firm andreson horowicz has sold a third of their shares. the shares were sold between 49 and $50. that makes the sale worth more than $111 million. kind of interesting that they decided to do that. the firm still holds more than 4.5 million shares. >> what do you think about that? >> at some point he has to harvest some kind of gains about this. he's still on the board, right? he can't leave but he can't hang out -- he can't be in there all the time. >> you know, some people say it's never bad. stocks do go up and they do go down. >> i remember that barons commercial. the mar
a deal with the ants but often the heiress money back. they don't want them to sell and there are very open to us in this. and from the same kind and i think in the future of the mufti you. this will be main solution for these kind of problems. there will be a financial or other arrangements. and it's it's it's it's it's already the case than local arrangements and what were we talking about here. i mentioned a figure over fourteen hundred i think is one thousand four hundred six artworks. and it's the art curators are saying it's unbelievable the richness of this collection. do you suspect that there's a lot more true similar to this that we just don't know about yet. ms is a christian everybody is. and in the autumn because the we don't know when. how much the paintings and other pieces off on time i'd be hiding and being hidden in the mornings as i can and so on. we done nothing about this because a lot of these easel five. and i relaxed slow and we don't know nobody knows in this case is there a time that passes with looted art of this nature where cornelius garlic is not in charge
and work together. we don't need to go through 43 different attempts to repeal or deny people the access to health care. the affordable care act is a bill that was passed by both houses, sieb signed by the president and upheld by the supreme court. as problems arise, we should sit down and commit to work together. but republicans have to agree on the basic premises that health care is a right, not a privilege. >> other other issue: energy independence. what did you propose that is different? >> we have to wean off fossil fuels. investing in alternate energy resources while engaging in an all of the above strategy. we are getting to the point where we are exporting natural gas. but we have to have the all above strategy. not drill baby drill. >> who is the next generation of leaders in congress? would you like to be speaker of the house? >> i am focused on what is in front of me and that is doing the best i can for the 23ered congressional district. >> who is the next generation of leaders in the house? on both sides. >> there are a number of members on both sides of the aisle that are b
here. i don't see it as a burden. you got to have a huge ego to say oh, please it's a burden for you speculating on me to be the leader of the free world. that's a pretty huge ego to be complaining about that. it's complimentary and i'm flattered. >> good morning. it's thursday, november 7th. welcome to "morning joe." with us on set -- >> you introduce and i ask. >> no, no. >> i'll ask that question. >> no. >> you can take all the time you want. >> no. >> i'm going jump straight to it. chris christie, we love him. he's wallowing in this. you did this. i love that zoom in. like that 1972 candidate. >> chris christie represents all the hopes and dreams. >> just answer the question now. just shut up now. come on. >> political talk, just stop it. answer the question. answer the question, if you will. if you were managing chris christie, would you tell him to wallow in this just a little bit? >> he's not. >> i don't anybody manages chris christie. >> okay. >> but i think that to make sure that this moment is about a rise to national prominence, about a rise to winning national elections h
to death formed in october you don't absorb oxygen to the old voluntarily source of comedy and that the us to seek god it's not something that exists in the environments in such concentrations that could cause poisoning accidentally will momentarily aikido and a little to no salt as my uncle able to specify the cause of death when an aunt died at the highest in and then the two thousand full and too high based tv station and this is our front initiated the investigation announced today. liaison staff and was carried out an old top seed at the swiss scientists said that tests face several limitations. the answers are really yes or no in these situations is always uncertainty. certainly if we had access to samples for mr arafat from paris. if they'd been conserved we would've been able to give a clear answer. unfortunately they've disappeared. the palestinian liberation organization has called for an intense our inquiry. it's pointing the finger at israel which has consistently denied any involvement in staff and staff. asic is another one using brief again in a pool to be in a car used in t
to balance out all the orders. >> oftentimes ipos don't open at the order. >> what time did facebook open? >> facebook was way into the afternoon. the expectation is -- >> there were problems, but there's going to be a lot of people. >> right. 10:00 to 11:00 is not when. >> 10:00 to 111:00. >> it will open today. >> it will open today. >> no, he said -- when i -- i said who knows when it will open. he goes, i know when it's going to open. >> 10:00 to 11:00 is not knowing when it's going to open. >> the point is is that instead of everybody freaking out this morning when it doesn't open at 9:30 or 9:345 or 10:15 or 10:30 or 10:45 as i can imagine happening -- >> well, with an ipo, they have to put all the stuff -- my monitor, look at my monitor. >> ocd boy who can't handle things going out of walk -- >> it's like a picture on the wall. now that's too much. >> there. it's fine. for anybody who didn't know, joe has issues. if you want to get to him, leave the closet door open. >> if they've seen the show, they know. >> anyway, andrew, this is really -- i can argue a lot of different things.
the scene and let the merchants get back in and prepare it for reopening. we don't know yet about tomorrow. all of this, of course, coming on the cusp of the holiday season. guys. >> and after kenya and everybody was worried about the mall, the lone guy in the mall is everybody's biggest fear, obviously. and -- >> yeah. they may say they don't know how the guns got in -- >> yeah, i don't see any way of stopping it if someone wants to bring a -- you know, it's a free country. that's one of the downsides to being in the united states, i guess, is that -- >> yeah. that's -- >> down side to freedom. >> that said, joe, we talked to security officials after the kenya attack, you'll remember. and a lot of them said that the perimeter is supposed to be well out into the parking lot. but they're supposed to be looking for people who are coming in, looking for people exhibiting any signs. and, clearly, if this gun was not concealed, there will be questions about where they didn't catch it. because it's not just once you get into the doors of the mall, it's the parking lot and actually beyond that. >
said, i don't want anymore bs. melissa: yeeh. >> was his message. in other words we have to raise the standards inside so that culture improves. melissa: how is that tangible to the customer? if you say the experience has to change, they're being punished for mortgage-backed securities. average consumer doesn't even know what that is. >> from the consumer perspective what they experience with the bank, which did a study back in the spring what constitutes trust in banking today. we found it is about helpfulness. not about being straightforward and full disclosure. not even fairness. does the customer feel you're on their side. banking customers across the industry do not feel that with. melissa: maybe that is true. i happen to be the chase customer. i went into the branch. they bend over backwards to help it. we'll have whatever you can. i didn't have the right documents in the post office. i feel when you go into one of their branch anecdotally they're really helpful. you think that is not normal. >> i think it is not. melissa: they didn't recognize me. i was -- flattery will get
treatment the sudoku. really i don't know what we can see she really needs to have an x ray done quickly so you will know what scrum late. it's the same story and the time and it's in blue with a bow though district hospital has no running water or electricity. staff parents say they're having to make steel. we had a lot to me and yes that to me like that as far as this is one of eight children but they're just hard to use the com and use the keys it means you have a diet for the bus on the books i got back to hk but i didn't think about the proper doctors are forced to treat patients life last night until power can be re storage. hospital staff say they desperately need water and the medical supplies comments by the international community. and for their patients surviving the aftermath of the typhoon me just be the hardest part the nominees and no amount of spinning can change what happens in sydney that that's a bronze finest of responding to john kerry's comments about iran being to blame for the continued the ato in switzerland job i'm sorry says the toll could trot top three days ago
in after hours trading. ceo marissa mayer speaking at its salesforce.com meeting last evening. >> we don't think we're treating ours as mobile first. when you look at what's happening with the mobile trend overall in our industry, it's clear that it is a -- and you can ride it through the invention. yahoo! like many companies, has to constantly reinvent itself. the scary part about reinvention is it happens with platform shift. >> there's a little bit of financial industry news for you this morning. jpmorgan holding a conference call with analysts after yesterday's announcement with that mortgage settlement with the government. jamie dimon explaining that most of the toxic numbers were inherited. >> bear stearns, did not had not happened that way, it was a house on fire. it was imploding. we did it because we had to. we never expected this to happen. >> pete williams caught up with attorney general eric holder, talked about the government settlement. >> one of the things that we worked on through this settlement was the possibility of the criminal investigation woon would not be preclude
level at the end as it goes in. >> why don't we start on the positive side. let's look at strengths of the deal. the most intrusive inspections, it stalls. the march towards nuclear capability with all the restrictions, and we are giving away small concessions on sanctions because it's really in the grand scheme of the sanction, it's really not that much that we are giving up. do you think it's a good deal? >> this was the final deal, it would not be a good deal. mr pickering said we are in an interim stage. my concern is we get the intruce i-in possessions which is a -- intrusive inspections by is a good thing. there's nothing about the military aspects of the nuclear program, and the ability to visit the parcheen site north west of tehran, which is a major concern. that's part of the challenge, that there has been parallel activity ongoing that has been concerning the western powers for some time in addition to the enrichment that was spoken about. that's my concern that during the six-month deal they may be able to cap the 20% enrichment efforts and neutralize it to some degree.
the work of one man. the party say they have not identified and they don't know who he is asking for any witnesses or anyone might recognize this man to get in touch. gaza city don't have any idea what his motive than ben. take this picture is and how in a way to say it stopped around ten am at the offices of the bannister nice day. yet the headquarters of the gods which is a left leaning newspaper here in paris other offices are located near the staff that could be a man walked in around ten o'clock this morning took out a rifle and opened fire. he shot a young photographers aged twenty seven. i kept catching me in the chest and the arm that young man has been hospitalized and we understand he's in very serious condition. last thing we heard was that he still fighting for his life. not that can actually trace the steps of the gunmen after he opened fire in me that's who he fled the scene probably getting on the metro a little while later there were reports of gunshots being fired at the difference outside is this occasion the bank. he then apparently hijacked a car of forcing the driver
jihadists, they don't have a coherent plan. >> rose: but the jihadists and all-- of they-- what percentage of the rebels are they? and what remains of what was the beginning a sort of rebel force not principally populated by islamists? >> well, unfortunately, as it stands today, the majority of those rebel groups jihadist and afghani-type jihadists -- >> al qaeda affiliates. >> exactly. the united states understands it very well, and that's why the united states, mr. obama and mr. kerr, have been moving slowly but surely, not rushing the exit of assad from his position right now. >> rose: and do you think that was part of the reason they pulled back from the attack, that perhaps they can moderate and not rush him out of employer because they fear what will happen if he is eliminated? >> exactly. putin has seen this opening and he immediately, between the united states and syria, and sure enough, president obama immediately grabbed that opportunity and instead of going and attacking syria militarily, he accepted to take the-- havi having-- to take out the chemical weapons of bashar peaceful
say the white house's proposal which would allow insurers to tip selling older plans that don't meet the minimum requirements of the health care law, that they would be impractical and difficult to implement. meanwhile officials say up to 40% of healthcare.gov is still being developed, but the site can now handle up to 25,000 users at one time. >>> and even though president obama said he, quote, continue have enough awareness of the issues surrounding the website, white house officials now say he was briefed on the possible online failures earlier in the year. yesterday the president spoke about the ongoing partisan fight over the affordable care act. >> we are going to have to, a, fix the website so everybody feels confident about that. we'll have to obviously remarket and rebrand. and that will be challenging in this political environment. i think that we probably underestimated the complexities of building out a website that needed to work the way it should. what was already going to be hard was operating within a very difficult political environment and we should have anticipated
the agreement. the president if you don't want to be cynical, maybe we ought to be happy and think positively. if you hear the president, he says no deal will go into place in six months if they violate any of these. >> right. we should be totally clear about two things. one, this is not just between iran and the united states, this is an agreement between the united states and iran as well as great britain, germany, france, china, and russia. this is really a global deal. also be clear, it's not just the israelis, it's also the gulf states and saudi arabia. i'll make a third point. anyone that i've ever spoken to in the region is that iran will have one because they have the desire and they have the money to pay for it. >> when i was first listening to the breaking news on fox news channel, six month deal seems like it's reasonable because it's a short period of time. you've got intrusive inspectors going in there. the iranians have agreed to this. this is part of the six-month deal. the thing that's interesting is if after six months they haven't followed the deal, what? >> then there's no
this holiday season you don't even have to get off the couch. >> most of the deals are going to come around and can be found online, too. >> reporter: the coupon queen took a break between turkey and pie to share her strategies. tip number one, use ebates.com to get cash back on online purchases. tip number two, start following a blog, like retail me not.com, that gathers all the online coupon codes for you. tip number three, cancel that online order right before you place it. chances are you'll soon get a discount offer for that very item in your in-box. as for joni, she spent black friday shopping for charity. >> i got all this stuff here, drum roll, please, i paid $148, that's 85% savings. >> reporter: crothers says we can achieve big savings if we do homework. she suggests researching all the items on your list, finding the best price, instead of going to three stores, go to one and ask for a price match. >> good advice. thanks so much. from the retail marketplace to the health care marketplace. tomorrow is the self imposed deadline for the obama administration to get health care.gov on
to temporarily halt their nuclear program for a period of six months. >> stephen: six months! you don't negotiate a deal with terrorists that last six months-- unless you're raising the debt ceiling. (laughter) folks, iran is a nation of radical muslims hell bent on acquiring nuclear weapons. we can't have nukes in the middle east. someone might bomb israel and then they'd have to use their nukes! (laughter) fortunately, the deal was stopped by our closest ally. >> france says forget it, no deal. >> the french just said look, pause, forget it. we want to halt the entire program. >> france was the country to stand up and say no to this. they said the deal was too easy on tehran. >> stephen: yes, france! the country that put the oui in "we give up." (laughter). (cheers and applause) folks, of the six-nation team -- we love it. we love france. (laughter) of the six-nation team negotiating with iran, only france had the escargots to say non and you know it was a band deal if france is turning down a six-way. (laughter) french foreign minister and butler in a grey poupon ad laurient fabius said "the a
that passed. change something the people don't want. the next step in this drama, if you will, is up to the american people. i have done what i can for the last three years to either try to deflect or improve or not damage people so badly with this thing b , but honestly you remember in 1988 when the catastrophic healthcare plan was revealed after the people rose up as one and said you have to get rid of this thing? that is the type of citizen involvement that is going to be required to reverse course on what you directly point out is a massive government over reach. >> let's move on to the legislation itself. the european idea is healthcare isn't right. what do you say to these american politicians making the same point? >>> oo it is a right and not a privilege. >> it is a right, not a privilege. >> not a privilege for a fortunate fubu a right for all of us to enjoy. >> it's a right government should give it to people? >> i refer to look at it more as a responsibility. i recognized it wasn't my responsibility to provide food, housing and healthcare for my familiar -- it was my respo
to. >> and good news is bad news >> you are right about that. exactly. >> for fighting fires we don't do on our own. imagine if everybody had their own fire service. >> imagine that. the truth is private fire companies were all over america and do a better job. >> you watch liu spend your money. >> our traffic lights are synchronized so there are no traffic jams. >> private parks are cleaner and safer. libraries our better run. much more computerized. a private water system the government could not do to bring clean water for less because the workers work. >> were you goofing off before? >> occasionally. but the left hates privatization. >> that no one to pay for them. >> yes but we just want it spent well. >> privatize the police department and the fire department everything. >> yes. privatize everything. that is our show. tonight. john: privatize everything. maybe i did not mean that i got carried away but there are some things government ought to do. most are listed in the constitution. but this is thin and it makes it very clear there is not much the founders thought what they s
. >> unfortunately, i don't think too many cab drivers were talking about this. i wish they were. >> right. but it did get frothy and combined with the fed and people talking about that this was all pushed up by an accommodative fed around the world, the market ended up high. the ecb cut rates yesterday, the fed is still moving and the market closed down 150 after twitter priced. people do start saying, wow, there are some toppy things happening here. maybe they take a little bit off. when is the last time we had our 10%er? >> we haven't. and i need to do some more work on this. >> there were two public funds that owned private shares of twitter and they actually went down yesterday. >> that's weird, too. >> weird, too. >> and watching the other ones that were totally overheated, they went down, as well. >>> disney, i don't know, do we really care about a small company that barely does anything any more? no. disney is pretty important. >> yeah. >> disney, old media. an awesome company. very well managed. posting better than expected results after the close. the nebs were held by higher vis
served on this veterans day. we don't have a lot of time. we have wonderful responses. i'll leave you with simply steven crawford. just say thank you. "morning joe" starts right now. >>> good morning, everyone. it is monday, november 11th. welcome to "morning joe." with us onset we have msnbc and "time" magazine senior political analyst mark halperin. how is it going? >> good morning. >> double down. >> and national affairs editor msnb chris political analyst john heileman. they're co-authors of "double down." we're going to begin on a somber note. the absolute devastation from a super typhoon in the philippines. overnight the first u.s. relief flight loaded with water and generators arrived in one of the harder hit areas. marines and sailors are also helping with the search and rescue operations. up to 10,000 people are feared dead in one province alone after one of the strongest storms on record. itv's angus walker has more. >> reporter: this amateur video obtained by filipino broadcaster abscbn shows the moment of impact. a wall of water 20 feet high by some accounts crashing into
are dropping out. they don't want anything to do with obamacare. apple, amazon, netflix, facebook, twitter they're all in the news today and we are covering it. "varney & company" is about to begin. when we made our commitment to the gulf, bp had two big goals: help the gulf recover and learn from what happened so we could be a better, safer energy company. i can tell you - safety is at the heart of everything we do. we've added cutting-edge technology, like a new deepwater well cap and a state-of-the-art monitoring center, whe experts watch over all drilling activity twenty-four-seven. and we're sharing what we've learned, so we can all produce energy more safely. our commitment has never been stronger. >> look at that. all right, here is the big story, let me tell you it's another obamacare bombshell. huge implications is the reporting from forbes. not only did the administration know that 10 million people would lose their private plans, it knew that modifications to the law would cause them to lose their employer provided plans and the numbers are staggering. by november of 2014, 66% of sm
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 417 (some duplicates have been removed)